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The Love Is Not Abuse curriculum was created by a task force consisting of educators and domestic and sexual violence experts from Columbia University, George Mason University, the University of Kansas, Virginia Community College System, Northern Virginia Community College and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) following the May 2010 murder of University of Virginia student Yeardley Love.

The Love Is Not Abuse college curriculum is available online, free at commissioned Knowledge Networks to conduct quantitative research among students enrolled in four-year colleges (ages 18 – 29).

At the same time, 43 percent of the women surveyed who date said they had experienced violence and abuse from a partner — and 60 percent of them said that nobody had stepped up to help.

The survey was conducted last fall by research firm Knowledge Networks, which interviewed 330 female and 178 male students from four-year universities across the country about their dating experiences and definitions of abuse.

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Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Dating violence is widespread with serious long-term and short-term effects. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have severe consequences and short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen.Despite the high number of students experiencing these types of abuse, more than one-third of college students (38%) say they would not know how to get help on campus if they found themselves in an abusive relationship.The survey, “Liz Claiborne Inc.’s Love Is Not Abuse 2011 College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll,” was conducted by Knowledge Networks to address the lack of data on dating violence and abuse among college students and to increase the understanding of this problem on college campuses nationwide. Karen Singleton, Director of Sexual Violence Response, a program of Columbia University Health Services, “This survey expands on earlier reports and reinforces the complexity of the issue.” Among the findings are: “The findings of this survey prove that colleges and universities need to provide a more comprehensive response and additional creative educational programs to address dating violence and abuse,” said Jane Randel, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications, Liz Claiborne Inc.In high school, Paquet says the topic of relationships only came up in her final year, Secondary 5 when most students are 16 or 17 years old."I would have liked to learn about this as early as Secondary 2, maybe Secondary 1," she said, when students are around 12 to 14 years of age.

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